DBC's sensor technology comprises of two key technologies: silicon microfabricated electrodes and aptamer biosensing. All DBC sensors produce high temporal and spatial resolution of physiological process, electrical and/or biochemical. The fast measurements  allows researchers to see unprecedented chemical signatures in the brain and blood stream (see table below).

Minimally invasive

DBC sensors collect measurements every ~40um on a microfabricated needle with dimensions 60um x 15um x the length required to research target areas (typically 3-9mm). DBC sensors have a cross-sectional area 25-250x smaller than the lead alternative technique - microdialysis. Smaller sensor reduce tissue damage during insertion, resulting in a more natural tissue environment from which to collect data. The scar formation and inflammation surround a microdialysis insertion site are major drawbacks to the technique.

Continuous measurement

DBC's NMM sensor (see Products) are commonly used for 50kHz sampling of neural firing, allowing researchers to record single unit cell firing. DBC's biosensor collects chemical concentration data every second, representing a significant advantage over the 5-20 minute collection periods required by closest competing technology, microdiaylsis.

Analyte agnostic

Our use of aptamers as the biorecognition element in our sensors allows our platform to be adapted to any target molecule - neurotransmitters, novel drugs, proteins, etc. Additionally, the flexibility of aptamers through the engineering of DNA sequences  allows us to hone in on the desired sensor dynamic range and signal amplification. Enyzme sensors, a commonly used technology for a selected group of molecules (glucose, for example), rely on the natural existence of an enzyme against the target molecule, and thus are unable to detect molecules such as novel drugs.

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 Aptamers bind to their target molecules through electrostatic attractions between nucleotides and specific atoms of the target molecule . The use of RNA/DNA as aptamers were discovered in 1990s by both Ellington and Szostak, and Tuerk and Gold.

Aptamers bind to their target molecules through electrostatic attractions between nucleotides and specific atoms of the target molecule . The use of RNA/DNA as aptamers were discovered in 1990s by both Ellington and Szostak, and Tuerk and Gold.